South Asian Journal of Research in Microbiology https://mail.journalsajrm.com/index.php/SAJRM <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>South Asian Journal of Research in Microbiology</strong>&nbsp;<strong>(ISSN: 2582-1989)&nbsp;</strong>aims to publish high quality papers (<a href="/index.php/SAJRM/general-guideline-for-authors">Click here for Types of paper</a>) in all aspects of Microbiology. By not excluding papers based on novelty, this journal facilitates the research and wishes to publish papers as long as they are technically correct and scientifically motivated. The journal also encourages the submission of useful reports of negative results. This is a quality controlled, OPEN peer-reviewed, open-access INTERNATIONAL journal.</p> en-US contact@journalsajrm.com (South Asian Journal of Research in Microbiology) contact@journalsajrm.com (South Asian Journal of Research in Microbiology) Wed, 08 May 2024 12:59:00 +0000 OJS 3.3.0.11 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Isolation and Identification of Microorganisms Associated with Pap and Stored Corn Starch https://mail.journalsajrm.com/index.php/SAJRM/article/view/363 <p>This study isolated and identified microorganisms associated with pap and stored corn starch. This was done to help portray spoilage microorganisms associated with stored corn starch and pap. The study was achieved through laboratory analysis of pap sample and stored sample over a period of 7days. Result obtained shows that the pap samples are contaminated with bacteria. The profile of bacteria evaluated shows an increasing trend over the retention period with isolates of bacteria such as <em>Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp </em>and<em> Lactobacillus sp.</em> which are not entirely eliminated when prepared in heat (pap). The isolation of fungi from the pap samples revealed that it could serve as a means for the transmission of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. However, fungi isolates such <em>Rhizopus sp. </em>and<em> Aspergillus sp. </em>was not present in pap due to the fact that they are mesophilic fungi and cannot survive at temperature ranges above 60<sup>O</sup>C. Comparison of samples showed that pap preparation is an efficient technique for elimination of fungi but significantly ineffective in complete elimination of bacteria. It can therefore be concluded that cooking of pap does not entirely eliminate pathogenic microbes and hence caution should be taken in pap consumption.</p> Orogu J.O., Okinedo, J.I., Aphiar, A.E., Ukolobi O. Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://mail.journalsajrm.com/index.php/SAJRM/article/view/363 Wed, 08 May 2024 00:00:00 +0000 Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori IgG Antibodies and Associated Risk Factors among Asymptomatic Vegetable Sellers in Uyo, South Nigeria https://mail.journalsajrm.com/index.php/SAJRM/article/view/364 <p><strong>Background: </strong>Vegetables are essential part of people’s diet and are sometimes consumed raw and often without heat treatment or thorough washing, hence some studies suggested it serves as vehicle for the transmission of pathogenic microorganisms like <em>Helicobacter pylori</em>. The source of contamination has also been traced to sellers of vegetables who are involved in unhygienic practices which contribute to the dissemination of pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore the aim of this study was to provide information on the seroprevalence of <em>H. pylori</em> IgG antibodies and associated risk factors among asymptomatic vegetable sellers in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria.</p> <p><strong>Materials and</strong> <strong>Methods:</strong> Blood and stool samples from 142 participants were included in the study. Blood samples were analyzed using the rapid diagnostic method while the stool samples were analyzed using Enzyme linked immunosorbent Assays (ELISA).</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> A total of 85 (59.9%) were positive by rapid diagnostic test (RDT) while 53 (37.3%) were positive by stool ELISA test. Risk factors like age, marital status, residency family size, years in vegetable business, source of vegetable, wash before stalling etc were all statistically associated with (p&lt;0.05) with <em>H. pylori</em> prevalence.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> This study revealed that unhygienic behaviors by vegetable sellers are associated with high risk of <em>H. pylori </em>infection to vegetable consumers. </p> Geraldine Micah Nworie , Anthony Nathaniel Umo , Ekom Ndifreke Edem , Ifeoluwa Abraham Adeagbo , Olajide Joseph Akinjogunla , Geoffrey Ekonugwem Uzono , Nyakno Friday Jimmy , Adejumobi Olawale Abiodun , Rachel Sylvester Okon , Ene Omenyi Bawonda Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://mail.journalsajrm.com/index.php/SAJRM/article/view/364 Thu, 09 May 2024 00:00:00 +0000 Bacillus and Aspergillus Prevalence: an Investigation into the Indoor Microbial Quality of Built Environment at the University of Port Harcourt: Nigeria https://mail.journalsajrm.com/index.php/SAJRM/article/view/365 <p><strong>Background:</strong> Inadequate indoor air quality poses significant challenges in school environments, stemming from factors such as overcrowded classrooms, insufficient ventilation, and substandard construction and maintenance practices. Bacterial and fungal contaminants in indoor air present serious health risks.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong> This institutional-based cross-sectional study focused on selected learning halls to assess bacterial and fungal loads using the settle plate method. Analysis was accomplished through standard cultural methods. Nutrient agar and Potato Dextrose agar plates were exposed for 15 minutes to capture bacteria and fungi, respectively.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The study revealed a total bacterial load of 8300 CFU/m<sup>3</sup> in the morning and 10400 CFU/m<sup>3</sup> in the evening. The highest bacterial load occurred at MBS 25 (3200 CFU/m<sup>3</sup> in the morning and 3700 CFU/m<sup>3</sup> in the evening), while the lowest was recorded at the Arena (310 CFU/m<sup>3</sup> in the morning and 990 CFU/m<sup>3</sup> in the evening). Similarly, fungal loads varied, with the Arena recording the highest (620 CFU/m<sup>3</sup> in the morning and 690 CFU/m<sup>3</sup> in the evening) and the Faculty of Science Auditorium the lowest (310 CFU/m<sup>3</sup> in the morning and 620 CFU/m<sup>3</sup> in the evening). <em>Bacillus</em> spp. dominated among bacterial genera (25.9%), while <em>Aspergillus</em> spp. was the most prevalent fungal genus (41.7%). Other bacterial genera included <em>Klebsiella</em>, <em>Staphylococcus</em>, <em>Enterococcus</em>, <em>E</em>. <em>coli</em>, and <em>Pseudomonas</em>, while <em>Penicillium</em> and <em>Candida</em> were among the fungal genera.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Mitigation strategies should target factors such as temperature, occupancy, and humidity to curb bacterial and fungal proliferation in indoor lecture halls, thus safeguarding the health of students and teachers in the University of Port Harcourt and similar educational institutions.</p> Chidinma G. Daokoru-Olukole, Juliana O. Pondei, Ejiroghene Avwerosuoghene, Emmanuel O. Fenibo, Herbert O. Stanley Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://mail.journalsajrm.com/index.php/SAJRM/article/view/365 Tue, 14 May 2024 00:00:00 +0000 Gram Positive Cocci Associated Urinary Tract Infections, their Prevalence and Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns https://mail.journalsajrm.com/index.php/SAJRM/article/view/366 <p><strong>Background: </strong>Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the third most common type of infection in humans globally. Gram-positive bacteria are said to be responsible for ten percent of urinary tract (UTI) infections. The study's goal was to profile gram-positive cocci-associated UTIs and their antibiogram, as they were observed at LASUTH.</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>This was a retrospective assessment of the Medical Microbiology Laboratory records of the LASUTH to review the in vitro antibiotic susceptibility patterns of gram-positive urinary bacterial isolates between April 2020 and March 2021. The bacteria were isolated and identified from routine urine samples using standard bacteriological methods and the API. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) was routinely performed by the modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test and susceptibility breakpoints were determined using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>2,253 urine samples were processed in the medical microbiology laboratory over the one year and 662 (29.4%) samples yielded Positive cultures. Of the 662 isolates, 494 (74.6%) were gram-negative bacteria. 164 (24.8%) were gram-positive cocci while 4 (0.6%) were gram positive rod. Among the gram-positive cocci’s isolated Enterococcus faecalis had the highest frequency 58 (35.4%). Aminoglycosides (Gentamycin and Amikacin) and Linezolid antibiotics were found to be the most effective drugs against gram-positive cocci bacteria except Enterococcus<em> spp.&nbsp; </em>For empirical treatment of <em>Enterococcus spp</em> in our facility Fosfomycin and Tigecycline are the best options, while for Streptococcus agalactiae associated UTI, Amikacin, Cefuroxime, Linezolid, and levofloxacin can be used for empirical treatment.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong>: The prevalence rate of gram-positive cocci associated UTI in this study was 7.3% (164/2253). The emergence of drug resistance in these pathogens to commonly used antibiotics is a thing of concern. Therefore, efficient antimicrobial stewardship programmes must be in place.</p> Oluwadamilare Afolabi Obe, Wasiu Bamidele Mutiu, Ibrahim Oladipupo Odulate, Adewunmi Akingbola Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://mail.journalsajrm.com/index.php/SAJRM/article/view/366 Thu, 16 May 2024 00:00:00 +0000